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Lory Cornelius Davis

 

Born: October 2, 1830 in Canandaigua, Ontario, New York

Died: July 1, 1865 in Granville, Putnam, Illinois

Father: Cornelius Davis VI born: June 19, 1799 in Sherburne, Chenango, New York

Mother: Sabrina Hawley born: AUG 13,1807 in Centerfield, Ontario, New York

 

Marriage 1 Mary Miller Leavitt born: March 11, 1833 in Heath, Franklin, MA

Married: 9 FEB 1854 in Charlemont, Franklin, MA

Their Children:

1. Hart Cornelius Davis born: April 19,1855 in Granville, Putnam, Illinois

2. Flora Adelaide Davis born: December 19, 1858 in Granville, Putnam, Illinois

3. Dora Augusta Davis born: December 19, 1858 in Granville, Putnam, Illinois

4. Lory Leavitt Davis born: December 5 1862 in East Charlemont, Franklin, MA

Please visit the following page

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=mollard&id=I02643

 

 

William Lyons Metcalfe

 

He was born on September 30, 1849 in Natchez, Adams County, Mississippi, fifth child of Oren Metcalfe and Zuleika Rosalie Lyons. He married Mary H. Roche in 1881 in Washington, D.C. when he was approx 32 years old. They were the parents of:

daughter: Bernice Roche Metcalfe (1882-1952)

son: John Rousseau Metcalfe (1885-?)

later they divorced.

William, was born in Natchez and baptized there on May 30, 1851. He adopted the use of the middle initial L. which does not appear in his baptismal record, and it is highly likely that it stood for Lyons, after his mother's family. Not much is known about his life. He trained for the law and ultimately qualified.

 

 

Peter Johnson 

G.A.R. POST, Ida Grove, Ida Co., Iowa

submitted by Conley Wolterman

The Matthew Gray Post #93 of the Grand Army of the Republic was organized in the fall of 1881 with 27 charter members. The final membership reached 127. It lasted until the last member, James Deal, died in 1930. The post was given its name in honor of Matthew Gray, a highly respected soldier who had died just before the organization.

For many years, the Mathew Gray Post was very active and great enthusiasm was displayed in the observance of Decoration Day and the Fourth of July. Each year on those days, the Civil War Veterans would dress in their blue uniforms, one carrying a large flag and the rest a rifle, and led the parade. "Kim" Page, a tall dressy man with a long beard, usually served as officer of the day. He rode a horse and with formality marshaled his men and marched to the place of the meeting. At times they marched to the cemetery; but as they grew order, they rode in carriages, formed a line at the cemetery, and fired salutes over each comrade's grave.

Richard Williams and James Deal were the last ones to answer the last roll call. Mr. Williams of Schuylkill Co., Pa., enlisted in 1864 and became a member of Battery F, 1st Illinois Light Artillery. He died April 21, 1929 at the age of 83 years.

Mr. Deal enlisted at Boone, Ia., March 1862 and served with Co. K Iowa Infantry. He received an honorable discharge at Jefferson Barracks in 1863, having been disabled by a severe leg injury while participating in the Battle at Iuka, Miss. He died March 12, 1930 at the age of 87 years.

Johnson, Peter - 4th Illinois Cavalry, Battles of Ft. Donaldson, Shiloh, Gettysburg, Vicksburg. Born May 1, 1840 Sweden, died Aug. 19, 1925, buried at Ida Grove, Iowa.

 

John T. Harper

 

John was born near Lafayette, Indiana, November 20, 1840, and died in El Paso on February 5, 1878 at the age of only 38. He came to Illinois in 1854 with his father, William W. Harper, pioneer of Harper's Grove west of Panola. He was a teacher, lawyer, and soldier member of Company G., 4th Illinois Cavalry, many of whose members were recruited by him. He was a Lieutenant, and was brevetted a Lieutenant Colonel after the battle of Shiloh. A graduate of Chicago Law School, he set up legal offices in El Paso in 1865 after the war, and for a time had a partnership with Robert G. Ingersoll of Peoria and J. J. Cassell of Metamora, who moved to El Paso. He was a prominent charter member of GAR Post named for S. T. Rogers. He founded the El Paso Journal on April 5, 1865, but soon sold it, devoting his time exclusively to his law practice. He was one of the defense counsel in the Kingston manslaughter trial.